Carroll County Supervisor Stephanie Hausman, a Republican, shares a moment in the Oval Office with President Donald Trump July 25. Trump administration officials invited Hausman to attend an Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska and Oklahoma state leadership day in Washington, D.C.
Carroll County Supervisor Stephanie Hausman, a Republican, shares a moment in the Oval Office with President Donald Trump July 25. Trump administration officials invited Hausman to attend an Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska and Oklahoma state leadership day in Washington, D.C.

August 13, 2019

The biggest part of meeting President Donald Trump for Stephanie Hausman — in the Oval Office, no less — may not have been, well, actually meeting the president.

It was what the Carroll County Republican supervisor was able to do as she walked outside of the White House on her way out of the West Wing to another meeting.

Hausman FaceTimed her daughter, 5-year-old Emery, back in Carroll.

“I need to tell you something: Your mommy just left the Oval Office,” Hausman told her daughter over the video chat application. “I know you don’t understand this right now. Someday you will.”

Hausman, 35, and in her first year as a supervisor, had the opportunity to chat one on one for a moment with the commander-in-chief July 25 while she was part of a four-state (Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska and Oklahoma) delegation of county officials to attend a policy summit at the White House.

The state leadership day at Old Executive Office Building on the White House grounds dealt with, among other things, trade, labor, rural drug abuse and infrastructure, the latter which is close to Hausman’s heart as the most common constituent comments she hears in Carroll County are about the condition of roads.

White House officials selected Hausman out of the county group to do interviews with the media and meet the president. She joined Grant County, Oklahoma, Commissioner Cindy Bobbitt and Mary Ann Borgeson, a Douglas County, Nebraska, commissioner and president of the National Association of Counties, in handling the media request. Then she went into the Oval Office.

Hausman said she quickly noticed the photos of the president’s family decorating the office.

“They are just beautiful people,” she said.

“Your heart stops,” she added of entering the Oval Office. “Just knowing some of the meetings that take place in that room, some of the conversations. It’s the most powerful room in the world.”

So what did Hausman say to the president?

“He was asking, ‘How am I doing in your state?’ ” Hausman said. “Now, I don’t feel it was the time to have your personal agenda out and say we need to do this, this and this. Just a brief summary. He had a lot of positive feedback.”

One county official, clearly not a Trump supporter, told the president, “My uncle thinks you are doing great,” Hausman recalled.

She met the president minutes later.

“I leaned over and I said, ‘I think you’re kicking ass.’ And he looks up at me and he goes, ‘I like you,’ ” Hausman said.

Hausman joked that she actually met the president in bare feet, as she had taken off her high heels and set them near a smaller desk in the Oval Office because of some pain in her feet from blisters caused by walking in them all day.

“I had taken off my high heels because I couldn’t do it anymore,” she said. “I have scars on my feet.”

She nearly left the Oval Office shoeless, but as she hit the door, Hausman walked back toward the president and retrieved her black Michael Kors heels.

“I get to the door and I thought to myself, ‘Oh shoot, my shoes,’ ” Hausman said. “So I go walking across the oval room, and the president goes, ‘Ma’am, what’s wrong?’ and I go, ‘I’m so sorry, I’m not used to wearing high heels all day. I have blisters all over my feet and I didn’t want to leave my shoes in your office,’ and he goes, ‘Wow, you are awesome!’ ”

Hausman’s colleagues with the county gathering didn’t let her live down the moment.

That’s why they were calling me ‘Iowa farm girl,’ ” she joked.