Tawnya Heinrichs shows her 45-pound compound bow to her daughter, Abby’s, middle-school class on May 17. Heinrichs and her husband, Jeremy, went to Manitoba, Canada last May on a bear excursion and killed two black bears.
Tawnya Heinrichs shows her 45-pound compound bow to her daughter, Abby’s, middle-school class on May 17. Heinrichs and her husband, Jeremy, went to Manitoba, Canada last May on a bear excursion and killed two black bears.

May 29, 2018

As Tawnya Heinrichs stalked a 220-pound black bear from a nearby tree, she waited until the perfect second before she extended her arm and launched the arrow.

Heinrichs and her husband, Jeremy, ventured to Manitoba, Canada, last May with a few of their friends to participate in their first-ever bear hunt. She recently visited Carroll Middle School students to tell her tale.

Teachers Jennifer Brincks and Robyn Schroeder combined their fifth-though eighth-grade special-education classes at Carroll Middle School on May 17 to watch Heinrichs’ presentation.

Heinrichs’ daughter, Abby, is a student in Brincks’ class at Carroll Middle School.

Brincks said she invited Heinrichs to her class because she encourages parent involvement in the classroom.

“Students take pride in their parents coming to their school and sharing their interests,” Brincks said.

During the presentation, Heinrichs played a video of the group’s bear hunt.

In the video, she perched herself in a tree with her husband as they watched the bears down on the ground. The first kill was his.

The camera showed the bear walking through the woods to a pile of meat in a barrel.

Suddenly, the camera flashed into a dimly lit shed where a forklift hoisted a large, dead black bear by its rope-bound legs.

“441 (pounds),” someone yelled as a pool of blood gathered on a white table by the bear’s mouth.

Next, the camera shot back to the forest, where Heinrichs carefully watched a smaller bear walk toward the meat-filled barrel.

She waited for the bear to move into a clearing, within reach of her 45-pound compound bow.

Finally, she released the bow and let the arrow shoot down. It hit the bear’s backside. The bear jumped up and sprinted into the forest.

Heinrichs descended from the tree and slowly approached the bear until she was 30 yards away from the animal.

She waited while it died.

“Oh man,” Heinrichs exhaled in the video. “That’s a rush. You want a rush? Shoot a bear with a bow. Not with a gun — with a bow. It took me five days, but I got her done.”

Next the bear lay sprawled on its back, being skinned for its fur and meat.

Brincks said the video displayed that hunting is a sport — not just for men — and teaches students the “art” of being quiet and waiting.

Hunting is a sport that dates back to our Native Americans for food, clothing, trade and shelter,” Brincks said.