Sue Van Dyke helps move an estimated 30,000 books from the nonfiction collection at the Carroll Public Library Friday morning. The library will reopen Monday following a two-week closure for replacement of carpeting, cleaning and painting. Staff removed some older parts of the collection to make room for new material, including expansion of the Christian fiction section. The library will host an open house during National Library Week, April 14-20.
Sue Van Dyke helps move an estimated 30,000 books from the nonfiction collection at the Carroll Public Library Friday morning. The library will reopen Monday following a two-week closure for replacement of carpeting, cleaning and painting. Staff removed some older parts of the collection to make room for new material, including expansion of the Christian fiction section. The library will host an open house during National Library Week, April 14-20.
The Carroll Public Library will reopen on Monday after a two-week face-lift that brought new paint, lights and carpet and a head-to-toe cleaning.

"People didn't want any orange at all," library director Kelly Fischbach said of the carpet change. "It was an awful orange from the 1970s."

The new floor is tan and brown with lines of blue and green. A few fuzzy remnants of the old orange dotted the floor this morning as library staff and other workers cleaned the furniture and vacuumed.

The chemical cleaner odors covered up that new carpet smell.

Staff had to shift the shelves of books to make way for the new floor in the past two weeks. The library has about 85,000 books, but patrons borrowed about 10,000 in the first two weeks of January as part of a push to lighten the load for the remodeling project. Patrons typically borrow about 7,500 books for the entire month of January, Fischbach said.

But the massive borrowing effort wrinkled the staff's efforts this week to reorganize the collection. They had to leave space for the books that will be returned starting Monday.

"OK, so let's go westerns here, and then mysteries here," Fischbach said as another woman worked to restock the collection.

As part of the project, staff moved the audio books to the middle of the adult side of the library and shifted about 30,000 non-fiction books. They've made more room for the library's Christian fiction books, which are gaining popularity, Fischbach said.

New lights in the children's section roughly doubled the brightness in the room, she said.