An entry in last year’s RPM Club Car Show brought back the good ol’ days of the 1957 Chevy fins. The 10th annual show Saturday, July 27, at <br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->Swan Lake State Park eastside shelter will include registration from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., judging until 2:30 p.m. and presentation of trophies <br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->at 2:30 p.m. The show also will feature deejay music, food and beverage concessions and drawings for prizes.
An entry in last year’s RPM Club Car Show brought back the good ol’ days of the 1957 Chevy fins. The 10th annual show Saturday, July 27, at

Swan Lake State Park eastside shelter will include registration from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., judging until 2:30 p.m. and presentation of trophies

at 2:30 p.m. The show also will feature deejay music, food and beverage concessions and drawings for prizes.
July 25, 2013



After panic at the start of the inaugural year, RPM Club's Car Show quickly picked up speed.

On Saturday, the show celebrates its 10th anniversary, and organizers are looking for another turnout of well over 100 vehicles at Swan Lake State Park's eastside shelter.

Registration will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., judging will take place until 2:30 p.m., and trophies will be awarded at 3:30 p.m. Registration cost is $12 in advance or $15 on Saturday. Spectators' admission is free view the rows of cars and trucks ranging from rat rods to Corvettes. The show will also feature deejay music and food (sandwiches grilled by Hy-Vee) and drink concessions. There will be drawings for door prizes, and as part of the milestone anniversary, there will be 10 drawings for $50 cash prizes for participants with vehicles in the show.

RPM Club president Kevin Eischeid and public relations director Paul Baumhover say the show has consistently drawn 120 or more entries in recent years and hit a high of 145 a few years ago.

In an interview this week, Baumhover recalled the anxious moments before the first show when, after all the planning, the day began with a dreaded rain.

Organizers faced the question: "What are we going to do if after all this planning and work, the show is washed out?"

"By 10:30 or 11 o'clock it quit raining, the sun came out and the cars started coming in," Baumhover recalls.

That first show drew 83 entries.

"I thought that was danged good," Baumhover says.

And the event has gotten bigger and better ever since.

In the first year, only one trophy was awarded in every class. Now the top three in every class receive a trophy. Over the years new classes - such as rat rods and high-school participants - have been added.

In recent days, Baumhover has received calls from car owners from Nebraska and northwest Iowa who have expressed interest in participating.

Eischeid and Baumhover say they've pushed promotion efforts a little farther west this year and added that the show also receives good word-of-mouth advertising.

The show is just a fun way to spend time on Saturday, Eischeid and Baumhover said.

Spectators will see everything from just base vehicles to cars that are worth more than $100,000 and are hauled in a trailer in order to avoid road wear and tear.

Eischeid and Baumhover say that a big attraction of the show are the memories the vehicles stir. Spectators travel back in time and do some reminiscing as they view cars similar to ones they owned, or their parents or grandparents owned.

In addition to cars entered by contestants, the show will feature RPM Club members' vehicles (although they're not eligible for prizes), vehicles from local car dealerships, and the 1915 Model C tractor from Carroll County Historical Society.

The setting next in the abundant shade on the shore of Swan Lake has helped make the show a popular destination, Eischeid and Baumhover say. The National Weather Service forecast for Saturday calls for sunshine with the temperature rising to the low to mid-70s.

Eischeid and Baumhover also credit Carroll County Conservation with going the extra mile to spruce up the site before the show.

RPM Club has 100 to 120 members. The club was revived in 2000 after it had been active in the 1950s and '60s but then went into hiatus.

The club enjoys the support of 28 corporate sponsors. In return for their support, the sponsors receive advertising in the club's monthly newsletter. Eischeid and Baumhover say club members also show their thanks by making it a point to support sponsor businesses - such as restaurants - so the businesses see return on their money.

RPM Club is a non-profit organization, and it has donated over the years to a number of local needs such as Big Brothers/Big Sisters mentoring program, Carroll Fire Department, Carroll County Ambulance Service and Carroll County Conservation.