Ben Lorenzen and Scott Eickman test out some of roughly 16 obstacles that will appear in Saturday’s “Be the One” 5K mud run-obstacle course in Great Western Park in Manning. The goal of the 5K is to raise funds for the Manning EMS and the new firehouse that is currently under construction.
Ben Lorenzen and Scott Eickman test out some of roughly 16 obstacles that will appear in Saturday’s “Be the One” 5K mud run-obstacle course in Great Western Park in Manning. The goal of the 5K is to raise funds for the Manning EMS and the new firehouse that is currently under construction.
August 5, 2014



MANNING

Roughly 13 feet off the ground, volunteer firefighters and emergency-service workers Ben Lorenzen and Scott Eickman straddle a climbing wall constructed in part from barn-salvaged 2-by-4s, debating where to best place additional climbing ropes.

The vertical wall is one of 16 obstacles in Saturday's "Be the One" 3.2-mile, mud-run course in Great Western Park on the west edge of Manning. The race was organized by Lorenzen and Eickman as a fundraiser for Manning's volunteer fire and emergency services departments and new $1.6 million emergency services building.

Ground on the new fire station was broken in May, with construction expected to wrap up by the end of the year. About $1.3 million of the cost will be split among the city of Manning and surrounding townships, with the remaining $300,000 coming from donations. Just less than $100,000 remains to be raised.

Modeled after the nationally known Gladiator run, in which Lorenzen and Eickman participated two years ago, the Manning "Be the One" course is designed to reflect the work of the groups it recognizes - emergency medical services technicians, firefighters, military members and police officers, explained Eickman.

Other obstacles include:

- descents into and out of a creek, simulating a water-rescue situation; cars piled with tires, a nod to crowd-control needs at accident scenes;

- a 16-foot rope wall representing the need to be comfortable with height; "leave no man behind" in which participants will carry two tires roped together through a mud pit with, Eickman hopes, the sound of gunfire and explosions ringing in their ears via a nearby sound system;

- storming a mud pit - like storming a beach "if you have a really good imagination," Eickman added with a laugh;

- storming a post - a pile of hay bales from which volunteers will spray participants with a fire hose while they attempt to fire back with water balloons and launchers;

- "the grunt life," a crawl through two mud pits;

- "tornado alley," in which participants will enter an upright door and travel through strewn furniture with mock medical kits;

- "firemen's retreat," in which participants will pull back a 5-inch firehose full of sand before climbing over a net draped across a trestle;

- "suspect heading east," a simulated backyard chase in which participants will crawl through a mud pit under a piece of fence;

- and the race will end with a water slide to the finish line.

The course will start at the gun range and end at the shelter house. Waves will leave every half hour, starting at 10 a.m. and wrapping up around 3 p.m.

From 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., the two-piece acoustic Raccoon River Boys, featuring Manning's own Chris Muhlbauer, will play in front of the lake. Haze, a four-piece rock band from Atlantic, will play from 4 to 8 p.m. Manning's local grocery store will have fruit and water on hand from mid-morning to mid-afternoon, and the Manning Chamber of Commerce will offer grilled foods starting around noon. A beer garden will also be set up.

So far, nearly 80 individuals - from Carroll, Sac City, Breda, Glidden, Webster City and Manning - have registered to race, said Lorenzen. He hopes to see 120 to 150 runners on Saturday, adding that about 105 entries are needed for the race to break even. Though the majority of the materials have been salvaged or donated, and Eickman volunteered nearly 100 hours to build the obstacles over the course of six months, the cost of band fees and the $1 million insurance policy required by Carroll County for use of the park was unavoidable, said Lorenzen.

Sun and mid-70-degree temperatures are anticipated.