U.S. Rep. Steve King, R-Kiron, and his wife, Marilyn, meet supporters during a party at Santa Maria Winery in Carroll following Tuesday&rsquo;s election. King defeated Ames Democrat Christie Vilsack to win the Fourth District. <span style="font-size: xx-small;"><em>Daily Times Herald photo by Jeff Storjohann</em></span>
U.S. Rep. Steve King, R-Kiron, and his wife, Marilyn, meet supporters during a party at Santa Maria Winery in Carroll following Tuesday’s election. King defeated Ames Democrat Christie Vilsack to win the Fourth District. Daily Times Herald photo by Jeff Storjohann
Wednesday, November 7, 2012

U.S. Rep. Steve King, R-Kiron, continued his unbeaten streak in Iowa politics Tuesday night in capturing a sixth term in Congress with a healthy win over Ames Democrat Christie Vilsack, Iowa’s former first lady.

The two had battled on the airwaves and met face-to-face in seven debates in the 4th Congressional District, 39 counties stretching across western and central Iowa.

King said his equation for political success is straightforward and natural: his values match those of the district’s voters.

“They want their representatives to believe the same thing they do,” King said in his victory speech.

Several hundred King supporters joined the congressman at the Santa Maria Winery & Vineyard in Carroll to watch national election results Tuesday and celebrate King’s re-election with a 53 to 45 percent margin.

King carried Carroll County 55 percent to 43 percent, according to unofficial results from the Carroll County Auditor’s Office. Locally, King also carried Audubon, Calhoun, Crawford, Greene and Sac counties. In northwest Iowa, territory he has represented since 2003, King produced canyon-sized margins over Vilsack, winning with a whopping 83 percent of the vote in Sioux County, 76 percent in Lyon County, 68 percent in Plymouth County and 67 percent in Ida County.

King noted that he served in the Iowa Senate before being elected to Congress — and that he has won 11 elections.

“I just wanted to recruit somebody to represent me, and I ended up being the candidate in 1996,” King said.

King, who spoke from a podium at the winery while surrounded by his family, said his candidacy was inspired.

“It’s not me,” King said. “God gave us this mission. We’ve stepped up to that. And we’re going to defend our values. We’re going to take Iowa values back to Washington, D.C., and we’re going to defend them even more strongly than we did before.”

Vilsack watched results with supporters in Ames. Vilsack told The Daily Times Herald that she ran an aggressive race that gave voters a clear decision.

“I’m proud of the campaign we ran, and I can’t thank our staff, our volunteers, and my family enough for everything they’ve done,” Vilsack said. “We gave the voters in the 4th District a choice, and that’s what democracy is all about.”

King said he would continue working to repeal the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, but allowed that such a cause would be far more challenging with President Obama’s re-election Tuesday.

“Plank No. 1 still is repeal Obamacare,” King said. “Plank No. 2 is a balanced-budget amendment to the United States Constitution.”