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PUBLIC HEALTH

Carroll virus surge driven by middle-age residents, children

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People between the ages of 41 and 60 and children younger than 18 accounted for an abnormally large share of the number of new confirmed coronavirus cases in Carroll County when they began to surge in the last two weeks of August, according to county data.

Together the two age groups accounted for more than half of the 215 new cases in the county reported from Aug. 17 to 31.

Here’s the breakdown:

— Ages 0-17: 18 percent

— Ages 19-40: 30 percent

— Ages 41-60: 34 percent

— Ages 61-80: 14 percent

— Ages 81 and older: 4 percent

The category for ages 0 to 17 was notably higher than the county’s overall average for the pandemic as of this week, which was 13 percent, and it was considerably higher than the statewide average of 7 percent.

The age makeup of the county’s newly infected residents conflicts with the focus of state officials, who have largely blamed college students for accelerating the spread of the virus. Gov. Kim Reynolds recently closed bars and other alcohol-related establishments in six higher-population counties with that age range in mind.

There are now a total of 497 confirmed coronavirus cases in Carroll County since the pandemic began, and five people have died.

There were two deaths this past weekend. One person was between the ages of 61 and 80, and one was older than 80, according to Nicole Schwering, the county's public health director.

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